i adore being a grrrl


zorakatsdawta:

Hundreds of brown women in line for the book signing. #chimamanda #adichie #diaspora #AViewFromLenoxAve (at New York Public Library - Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture)


MY QUEEEEENNNNSSSSSS

zorakatsdawta:

Hundreds of brown women in line for the book signing. #chimamanda #adichie #diaspora #AViewFromLenoxAve (at New York Public Library - Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture)

MY QUEEEEENNNNSSSSSS

(via blackgirlstalking)

— 5 months ago with 39 notes
Mindy Kaling Defends Diversity On The Mindy Project →

blackgirlstalking:

Look. I know many of you are probably sick of talking about this, but I’ve grown increasingly angry about Kaling’s SXSW panel and her inability to just fucking get it and all of the think pieces declaring that she responded so well to the lack of diversity question and that it’s not her responsibility to “become the United Nations of shows” that at this moment I am so angry that even her face is irritating me right now. It’s petty as hell and I know it. 

Kaling responded to questions about the lack of diversity on The Mindy Project defensively, as she has in the past:

I’m a f*cking Indian woman who has her own fucking network television show, okay?”

And she’s right and that’s great! I was so happy when I learned that a fucking Indian woman was going to get her own network television show and was even happier when I started watching and enjoying, becoming invested in the relationships and the personalities, really caring about what happens to these characters. I like The Mindy Project. I love that this is a show that’s on network television. But Mindy Kaling is also a fucking Indian woman with her own network television show who has absolutely no interest in helping out other women like herself and does not care if she’s the only one doing so and would maybe even prefer that it stay that way.

Mindy Kaling is not the victim of some anti-fun and happiness bullying campaign meant to bring down the hard-working Indian woman. 

…and no one asks any of the shows I adore — and I won’t name them because they’re my friends — why no leads on their shows are women or of color, and I’m the one that gets lobbied about these things.” 

This is simply not true. It’s quite possible that the reason she believes this is because she is not paying attention to these conversations. Like, at all. Her and Lena Dunham are BFF and she somehow managed to miss the entire year of diversity critiquing of Dunham that was 2012 - and a good chunk of 2013. She’s not involved in the conversations where this criticism is taking place because she doesn’t care unless the critique is thrown at her. 

Good God, Mindy. I’m trying. I really am. There’s still hope for you to have an a-ha! moment. But it is an incredibly telling time when your anti-Dunham friends have kinder and more thoughtful things to say about her and her treatment of diversity on Girls than they have to say about you. 

- Ramou

— 5 months ago with 409 notes

fionagoddess:

Angela Bassett | The Power of Our Presence: Black Women in Hollywood 2014

(Source: fionagoddess, via thegist)

— 5 months ago with 10773 notes
"

I watched the documentary, even knowing that this might be giving credence to all of what I like to call “ignorant conscious folks.” You know the type well: these are the men and some women, who believe that everything, including their own mistakes, helplessness, insecurities and misgivings in life, are the fault of white men and their evil and manipulative black women cohorts. These are the folks that will in one hand hold black women up as queens of the earth but are also quick to sloganeer some misogynist, and occasionally violent language and action for those who fail to live up to their expectation of what a queen is suppose to be.

Through very real examples of black history and achievements were included, these scholars and historians also manage to weave a web of conspiracy, which makes black women into pathological figures who seek to harm the black man through their choices to obtain a degree and good jobs and homes. Throughout the film, Nasheed and some of the other historians non-historically asserted that black men are being emasculated by feminism, which teaches women to talk back freely and demand rights they don’t even need, and say that homosexuality only seeks to take black men out of their pants and put them into dresses. No, seriously, they really said that. Likewise, the “feminization” of the public education, which has not produced enough challenging “man work,” is the direct cause behind why women are obtaining higher degrees in education at greater rates than men, and why men have greater drop-out rates than women. Yup, that was in there too. So was the idea that the men are helpless in fending off all this sexual energy from these oversexed, European-minded black women, who are keeping black men away from their righteous paths.

After watching the first Hidden Colors documentary, I realized two things: First, my male friend who suggested this film to me is a freakin’ idiot, and now I suspect him to be a closet misogynist. And secondly, we must be in a real desperate state in our community for both knowledge and overall historical respect, if we are willing to promote these regressive gender roles and hyper-masculine ideas for the sake of black pride and power, even as these ideas tends to contribute to reasons why violence and abuse, among women in particular, are so pervasive and not taken seriously in the community.

And this is exactly why I refuse to watch the second Hidden Colors documentary, no matter how much praise it receives from those within the “conscious community.” I refuse to watch any nonsense, which trivializes the very real racial subjugation of black folks in order to promote a belief that the best way to uplift the community is through the continued degradation of black women. Despite what the documentary wants us to believe, our sexism and homophobia is not a triumph; instead, it is the continued recipe for how we as a community, stay losing.

"
— 5 months ago with 141 notes
howtobeafuckinglady:

pettycoatts:

howtobeafuckinglady:

floacist:

over-protected-life:

My friend just spilled the true tea

Britney dances original?



















DRAG HA. READ HA. SLAY HA.


LMFAO This isn’t a drag. Especially when you pick out the most basic moves that many performers have done.
Choreographers fucking exist for a reasonand all your favs have had one.
Plus, Britney has said multiple times that Janet is one of her role models and influenced her career.
Please see yourself out

It is drag because they were LITERALLY bragging about how original Britney’s move are orginal when all she is a budget Janet Jackson with dead hair follicles and and an even deader career than Janet’s. Let that bald white bitch take her meds and take her lashings in peace.

howtobeafuckinglady:

pettycoatts:

howtobeafuckinglady:

floacist:

over-protected-life:

My friend just spilled the true tea

Britney dances original?



DRAG HA. READ HA. SLAY HA.

LMFAO This isn’t a drag. Especially when you pick out the most basic moves that many performers have done.

Choreographers fucking exist for a reason
and all your favs have had one.

Plus, Britney has said multiple times that Janet is one of her role models and influenced her career.

Please see yourself out

It is drag because they were LITERALLY bragging about how original Britney’s move are orginal when all she is a budget Janet Jackson with dead hair follicles and and an even deader career than Janet’s. Let that bald white bitch take her meds and take her lashings in peace.

(via tina-knowles)

— 5 months ago with 3660 notes
"I think that one is not burdened by America’s terrible racial history, and I think when people say to me, ‘You’re different. You’re not angry,’ in some ways it also feels that I’m being made complicit for something that I don’t want to be complicit in. Because in some ways they’re saying, ‘You’re one of the good ones.’ And I think to say that is to somehow ignore the reality of American history. So for example, people will say, ‘Oh, you’re so easy to get along with.’ And they’ll tell me some story of some African-American woman they knew who just wasn’t like me. Which I find quite absurd."

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on being African but not African-American in the United States, Fresh Air Podcast

I recently finished Americanah and it quickly became one my favorite literary works. As an American born Black woman I don’t pretend to understand the immigrant experience, but I greatly appreciate Adichie’s work and the way she manages to beautifully illustrate the divide between Africans and African Americans while also highlighting the ways in which we are all connected. In this 26 minute interview with Terry Gross, in addition to discussing class privilege, Adichie also talks about her life in Nigeria, the desire to have straight hair, and “escaping the study of medicine” in favor of studying liberal arts in America. Click over to NPR and have a listen.

- Alesia

(via blackgirlstalking)

(via blackgirlstalking)

— 5 months ago with 488 notes

"60 Years of Cher" photographed by Richard Avedon, Vogue December 1974

(Source: tina-knowles)

— 5 months ago with 970 notes

howtobeafuckinglady:

performance-sofa replied to your post: i’m not like oth3r black gurls cause i…

yeah but are you mixed hmm

I’m 1/16 choctaw and half light skint *different*

THIS TOO

(Source: tina-knowles)

— 5 months ago with 7 notes

howtobeafuckinglady:

i’m not like oth3r black gurls cause i watch animés hehe <3

THIS

(Source: tina-knowles)

— 5 months ago with 38 notes